Category Archives: Cymreig/Welsh

Dydd Gwyl Dewi Sant 2017

Happy St. David’s Day to you all!

Some exciting news to celebrate:

Although the Welsh Rugby team is struggling in this year’s Six Nations…the Welsh in America are winning! For instance:

NEWSFLASH! Rimrock Opera Company in America will perform Joseph Parry’s Blodwen (the first Welsh opera) –in #Welsh!– in the Spring of 2019

The National Welsh America Foundation has changed its name but is continuing its work under another.

However, the Facebook page, set up by a Welsh fan will be carrying on to bring news about the Welsh (in America and in Wales).  That new page is on Facebook: Welsh-American News: Cymru in US and the link is: https://www.facebook.com/WelshAmericanNewsCymruInUS/

Enjoy and as Dewi Sant is known to have said:

“Gwnewch y pethau bychan. (Do the little things.)”

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Filed under Cymraeg/Welsh Language, Cymreig/Welsh, Cymru/Wales, Hanes Cymru/Welsh History, Y Cymry/Welsh People

Inheriting Justice

This month, I was fortunate to visit Cymru/Wales for a short time and gather images for possible use as covers for my upcoming series, Pendyffryn: The Inheritors, the first book of which is scheduled for publication in October (release date to be announced shortly). The cover for Justice is now ready but before the “Cover Reveal” I will tell you a little about this new series.

As you may know, the first series, Pendyffryn: The Conquerors consisted of five books: Invasion, Salvation, Betrayal, Revival and Reconciliation. Reconciliation is the only one that is set primarily in a country other than Cymru, although it begins and ends on the Cwmdu Ystad (estate) where Christophe Maides has defeated all his enemies but the one that has made him the Devil he believes he has become.

From the beginning of The Conquerors, the children of Jehan-Emíl deFreveille and those of Caryl Gernant are essential characters in the story. Jehan-Emíl’s purpose for invading the Gaer is to find a home for his three children after years of deprivation. Caryl Gernant has a home but her children are under constant threat from the wicked ambitions of Morgan Cwmdu.

Leaving Jehan-Batiste, Marshal, Cecilé and the soon to be born Guidry Emyr and Elan Cerith without a place to live or to leave Susanna, Heilyn and Christophe’s unborn child with no respite from their aunt’s cruelty, or the orphaned Jac with no future seemed unreasonable. Though each child will not have her/his own book, the future of each will be revealed to the, I hope, satisfaction of readers of the first series who have wondered…

Book cover of JusticeThe first book in The Inheritors series is Justice, the story of Marshal deFreveille and the apothecary’s assistant, Tanglwys Meinor, who are forced to endure each other’s company when Gwennan Pendyffryn determines that Marshal needs taming. Eilir Meinor, Tanglwys’s older brother, is Marshal’s nemesis and the two young men clash with violent animosity whenever they are in close proximity. Set during the turbulent times of the final decades of the 9th Century in Cymru, hatred, intolerance, war and desire play their part.

Justice is hard won and easily lost.

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Filed under Cymreig/Welsh, Cymru/Wales, Hanes Cymru/Welsh History, Rhamant/Romance, Ysgrifennu/Writing

For the Love of Language

LlyfrauIaithWriters are language lovers. Words and phrases are our tools, our tubes of paint and brushes, our clay and chisels. After my first visit to Cymru(Wales), I had a new dilemma and a new story to tell. The dilemma is the language I had heard in this Celtic country and the story is the history of its oppression and triumph.

As I mentioned in my post about emigrating to Cymru, I could not be one of those who move to a country and demand that the people, culture and language change to accommodate me. I moved to Cymru to become a participant in the success of the Cymry to withstand the onslaught of the dominant language and culture of the island that four distinct cultures share. In my post, Potted Brythonic, I outlined the linguistic history of the British Isles and the early strength of the Brythonic Celtic language, Cymraeg(Welsh), from Llydaw(Brittany) and Kernyw(Cornwall) to Yr Alban(Scotland).

All through the first year I lived in the capital city, I met folks who hated, loathed and despised the native language of their own country. This attitude confounded me.

Some of these people were not Welsh and had no real love of the country they lived in—they were English immigrants who truly believed that Wales did not exist except in a fantasy world of a few old codgers intent on keeping a dead language alive.

A few of the non-Welsh-speaking Welsh also wanted to see the language disappear—more out of a sense of longing for access to a culture and way of life they had been denied. If they couldn’t have it, no one else should either. Both of these attitudes are prevalent throughout the world, no matter where or who. We are a naturally envious lot and often want what we are least likely to get without great effort.

I am not a natural linguist, nor especially good with languages, my own or foreign. A great help was my love of language as an instrument and as an art form in itself. I had studied enough Spanish and French in school, as well as the structure and form of English to be aware of the interconnection between all Indo-European languages which have a Latin component.

Since Cymru was once a Roman colony, many of its official institutions (schools, the law, church, government etc.) have a Latin-based name. This is true of all European countries that were colonized by the Romans, hence the term Romance Language for every tongue spoken in Europe from Romanian to Italian, French, Spanish and Welsh.

Tintern Abbey Ruins

Abaty Tintern

Although the Brythonic Celtic languages are less recognizable as Romance languages, their official institutions and some common words such as ffenest/fenêtre/finestra/fenestra=window and pont/pont/ponte/pons=bridge, show this connection to their common Latin root. A word such as eglwys doesn’t seem to equate, however its Latin root, ecclesia clearly shows the link to iglesia and église.

But, as you can see from my half-shelf of books (above) on many languages, both Welsh and English are absent. A misguided assumption of familiarity? Nid ddylai rhywun fod mor sicr o’i allu. (One should not be so sure of one’s ability.)

But what is writing without knowledge and the seeking of it?

I am still a learner.

 

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Filed under Cymraeg/Welsh Language, Cymreig/Welsh, Y Cymry/Welsh People

Ebook Sale Begins March 4

All of my historical novels set in Wales/Cymru published by Eres Books, will be on sale at about a 65% discount through the month of March, beginning tomorrow until Monday, April 4th.

bannerLD5bksBook Cover Image: Traitor's Daughter by Gwion Dulais

This sale includes ALL my books currently listed on AmazonKoboBarnes & NobleAll Romance eBooks, and Smashwords during the same time period, approximately $1.35 each! Prepare your library for summer reading at these great discounts.

See also my contemporary romance novels – also on sale. For details see: Everwriting on WordPress.

 

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Welsh & Medieval Cookery Course

FEBRUARY 7-28: WELSH & MEDIEVAL COOKERY with Instructor Lily Dewaruile 

applesonwallA man’s gotta eat. Throughout history, great and heinous acts have happened around the table. From the State Dinner to the Kitchen Table, food and dining have played a role in events that shape our world. From the dawn of humankind, we have explored and experimented with what goes into our bellies. This course will concentrate on the food that fueled Celtic warriors before battles, soothed the political wounds of royalty and fed the tillers and millers through the Middle Ages. More than venison and Baldrick’s beloved turnip, what medieval clerics and princes ate was specific to social status and country of origin. Recipes for modern cooks and attention to historical accuracy—set your table for the woodsman and the duchess. Forget the potatoes. CLICK THE TITLE OF THE CLASS TO REGISTER.

About the Presenter: Lily Dewaruile (pen name of American novelist, Leigh Verrill-Rhys) lived in Cymru/Wales for thirty years, an immigrant to this Celtic country who fell in love with the language and the history as well as un Cymro arbennig (one special Welshman). While she and her Cymro were raising three fine young men, Lily continued her writing about her adopted country, set in one of her favorite periods in its history, the 9th and 10th Centuries. Her novels reflect her deep admiration for the people whose strength and commitment to their way of life and culture, endure and overpower those who come to conquer. Though none of her characters, nor many of the events of these novels, are real, they reflect the spirit and essence of Cymru.

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