A Day In Loch Garman

Statue of The Pikeman, 1798

The Pikeman in the Bull Ring

29 April 2011: I’ve spent this day in one of the first towns in Ireland to rebel against the foreign domination of this Celtic country first overrun by the Norman rulers of England in the latter part of the 12thC and subjugated for a further 800 years.

In 1798, at the Bull Ring, at the center of Loch Garman’s Cornmarket district, many Irish rebels lost their lives in an effort to rid their country of English rule. The place is now a public testimonial to the sacrifice they made.
In 1850, Thomas Carlyle called for the Irish to honor their country by planting Trees of Liberty. One of the slate plaques on the Square states that the fight for freedom began in America, was nourished in France and the seeds of liberty then fell in Ireland.
The Irish Catechism
What is that in your hand? It is a branch.
Of what? The Tree of Liberty.
Where did it first grow? In America.
Where does it bloom? In France.
Where did the seeds fall? In Ireland.

—-Cork, December 1797
Irish Breakfast served at Sidetracks on the Crescent Quay

Loch Garman was a random choice but ultimately wholly significant to the reason for my journey away from Cymru today. Although the trip was a statement, I did have ample opportunity to sample the local fare, not to mention the several glasses of Guinness.

Opposite Sidetracks is the Crescent Quay. The town has been a settlement since the earliest times and was important to fishing industries and international commerce from the arrival of the Norse in the 9thC. On the Quay is the statue of Commodore John Barry – a native son of Loch Garman – whose contribution, in 1783,  in the fight for American independence included firing the American Navy’s last shot of the Revoltuion.

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2 Comments

Filed under Cymreig/Welsh

2 responses to “A Day In Loch Garman

  1. Jess

    Congratulations on the first sale! No need to send a voucher. I’ve already bought the book. 🙂 LaLaLa! 🙂

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  2. Anytime you want to use the voucher, Jess, it will be my pleasure to sent it to you. Thank you very much for buying Traitor’s Daughter. Please let me know what you think of this story.
    –Lily LaLaLa!

    Like

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